Heavy Metal (Pens that is)!

Somewhere in an alternate universe, with the music of Black Sabbath, Iron Maiden and Metallica blasting in the background, the rebels of the London Pen & Motorcycle Club gathered at their Williams on Wonderland HQ to binge on coffee and show off their new ink, like this beauty that Doc showed up with (he’s not a real Doctor, that’s just a name he picked up somewhere):

From Fenix Tattoos in Seattle
From Fenix Tattoos in Seattle

Well, that’s not exactly what happened … we did binge on coffee and heavy metal, pens that is …if a pen sticks to a magnet, it meets the test!! Bring your flighters, filigrees, overlays, signets, silver, gold (more likely gold-filled), aluminum, titanium, gunmetal, shiny or matte and all combinations and permutations thereof. Some like their pens with a patina (you might say potana) and others like them looking brand spanking shiny new. They could be factory or farm fresh – maybe have a few scratches and dents or even some brassing, we won’t hold that against them. And don’t forget your pens that are part-metal, i.e., they might have a metal cap with a resin or other body; however, metal trim-only is not enough metal, sorry.

To wit, a great collection, in a large variety of makes, models and finishes – Sheaffer Targas and a significant number of Parker:

whole bunch more

Anyone for a Parker 75 – just pick your finish:

whack of 75s

Some Parkers, at least one Sheaffer (a Targa, I think) and a Pilot Birdie(?):

table shot

A Waterman 452 1/2V sterling silver filigree (pierced work) overlay and a bottle of Herbin Vert Olive:

small waterman w overlayA true classic, the Parker 75 Cisele:

parker 75

Another Parker 75, a Sheaffer Connoisseur and a Pilot Birdie:

P75 connoisseur and birdie

Quite a mixed bag here from L to R – a Montblanc Meisterstuck Sterling Silver Solitaire Le Grand 146, a Dani Trio Phantas aka the “snake pen”, a Sheaffer Imperial and an older model of the Visconti Travelling Inkwell:

MB146 and snake pen

A close-up of the Dani Trio Phantas (snake pen) …

IMG_1639

… and a close-up of the Sheaffer Imperial Brass engraving:

sheaffer imperial brassA couple of one-piece metal pens, i.e., an integrated nib, a titanium Parker 50 aka the “Falcon” and a Namiki-Pilot M90:
integrated nibs M90 and P50 falcon

Not sure this Stipula/Chatterley Pens Carbon Future Oversized Etruria LE qualifies but it is one sweet writer with that 1.1 mm stub nib!

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Remember these Cross pens – graduation presents, wedding gifts, they were ubiquitous:

cross cross cross

Can you say vermeil?  Rotring 600s, Sheaffer Targas and Imperials and a couple of Parkers:

IMG_1632

The old hidden compartment pen … how did that bottle of ink get in the picture?

hidden compartment pen

What – is this a remnant from the alternate universe, a Waterman Harley-Davidson:

Harley

A number of Parker Flighters with a couple of 75s for good measure:

flighters and 75s

We have some Sheaffers, a Lamy Studio and a blue Kaweco off to the side

bns

The pen in focus is an Aurora 80th Anniversary Limited Edition, a brilliant guilloche pattern cut in sterling silver while the pen slightly out of focus is a Conway Stewart “Drake” LE:aurora guilloche untitled

A side shot (above) and head-on shot (below) of the Aurora 80th anniversary LE, a Conway Stewart “Drake” LE (this is a massive pen, made from a solid rod of sterling silver, guilloche engraved in a classic wave pattern), a Conway Stewart J. Rake Demonstrator (based on their classic Duro design), a Parker 51 Special Edition (from 2002), a Parker 51 Flighter, a Visconti Spider, a Visconti Skeleton, a Waterman Carene Deluxe, a Waterman Exception Night and Day Gold, and of course, a Waterman Edson:

MAW2

What about you?  We always love to hear what you think of these Heavy Metal Pens as well as about your own Heavy Metal pens.  Do you have a particular favourite?  Surely you have at least one?

Blinded by Science (actually Ink Chromatography)

With apologies to Thomas Dolby …

When I’m filling my fountain pens
“Blinding me with science – science!”
I can smell the chemicals

“Blinding me with science – science!”
 “Science!”
 “Science!”

Inspired by this post by Richard Binder some of the more pseudo-science-minded members (in other words, a small but enthusiastic gathering) of the LPC thought it would be great fun to conduct a science experiment aka Ink Chromatography this past Saturday (Sept. 27) morning.

As most of us know, ink is composed of different dyes that are mixed together to give it a particular colour. With an eye dropper, some paper towels and water (using the eyedropper means we get to call it a science experiment – as long as you fill it right on the meniscus!) we can see what individual colours your favourite inks are made of. The photo ​below is (from left to right) Diamine Eclipse, Parker Quink Blue Black and Diamine Salamander.

20140921-IMG_5359

What did we learn? Most blues are blue, most purples are purple, brown’s are an interesting mix of colours, Herbin inks are very light on pigment and Noodler’s Inks that contain their permanent black in the mix leave the black in the centre and the colours running out to the periphery. It was fun. Science is FUN!

20140927-IMG_4843 20140927-IMG_4842 20140927-IMG_4840

Matching Ink Colour to Pen Colour – Conclusion

First things first. Here are the names of the ink swatches in the scan:

1. Diamine Tropical Blue
2. Diamine Royal Blue
3. Diamine New Century Sapphire
4. Herbin Eclat de Saphir
5. Herbin Blue Pervenche
6. Noodler’s Ottoman Azure
7. Private Reserve Lake Placid Blue
8. Waterman South Seas Blue

Montegrappa considers my new pen to be turquoise. While turquoise is not included in the actual name of any of these inks, The Writing Desk includes two of these eight inks in its Turquoise Col-o-rama, namely #5 Herbin Blue Pervenche and #8 Waterman South Seas Blue.

Using a picture of the pen as well as a scan of the ink swatches obviously makes it difficult to match the two for a variety of reasons. IMHO, the biggest problem is the 2-dimensional picture cannot possibly show the depth and variation of the colour of the pen.

While I have not made my final decision, I have reduced the possible choices to three, listed below in the order of my likely preference:
1. Diamine Tropical Blue
5. Herbin Blue Pervenche
8. Waterman South Seas Blue

I like the Diamine Tropical Blue because it appears, to me at least, to include a few more darker shades of blue than either of the Blue Pervenche or South Seas Blue. Whether I choose one of these three, the remaining five or one of your other suggestions, I don’t think I could go wrong because they are all wonderful colours of ink, IMHO.  For example, I know that some suggested #6 Noodler’s Ottoman Azure, which has been a long-time favourite of mine.

Thanks again to all of you for your suggestions and comments.

Herbin Ink

Herbin Perle des Encre Ink

Some of the most popular inks are made by J. Herbin – I have used their cartridges and bottles (you know, the demi ones with the pen rest) for years.  My personal favourites are eclat de saphir and poussière de lune; my youngest daughter’s one and only favourite – rose cyclamen.  I am looking forward to trying Vert Empire and Lie de Thé.

Interesting to note that the top selling inks made by Herbin include Perle Noire, Violette Pensée and Bleu Myosotis.  You can find out this information, as well as the history, manufacturing, download an ink chart and more from Pen And Co.’s Herbin ink pages, starting with the history page.

In an earlier post, I mentioned that I had purchased my Conklin Crescent filler from Jean Elie at Pen And Co. – with excellent results.  Well, in reviewing the Pen And Co. website after my pen purchase, I discovered a number of other goodies, including the best kept secret on the internet (hopefully not for long!).  Pen And Co.  sells Herbin inks here for the incredible price of just under  6 Euros per bottle and free shipping with a minimum order of 3 bottles (about $22 Cdn).  I don’t know anywhere that you can get this price and service!