“100” Pens – November 5 and 12, 2011

We decided to use a different type of theme for November 5 and 12, 2011 – “Pens associated in some way with the number 100”.  Now there are the obvious choices like those pens with “100” in their model name., e.g., a Conway Stewart 100 or a Parker 100.  Having said that, we challenged our club members to think about this one, confident that that they are all a bit smarter (and creative) to come up with a pen or pens with a model number of 100.  For example, they might consider pens that cost $100 or are a 100 years old or are number 100 of xyxyx or number xx of 100? Maybe they have used a pen 100 times or a pen that is now worth $100.  I think you get the gist of what we are thinking. 
  
One perhaps obvious but still interesting idea was a combination of two pens, in this case, a Parker 25 matched with a Parker 75 in similar finishes – stainless steel and black.  Nice thinking!

 

 
Of course, let’s not forget one of the obvious choices, a Parker 100, in cobalt black.  
 

Now in the tray of pens below, there is a veritable potpourri of “100” pens, mostly modern with a few vintage mixed in for good measure!

From left to right, are the following fountain pens:
  • a blue Waterman Charleston (that is based on the Waterman 100 year pen);
  • a Waterman LeMan 100 Opera Series pen  in black acrylic resin over brass and carved with a unique chased bargello stitch pattern;
  • a limited edition Waterman Liaison “Cobra” fountain pen with black chasing that makes it ‘look’ and ‘feel’ like snake skin (the Liaison replaced the Man 100/200 as Waterman’s “top of the line” pen c. 1994);
  • a black & gold Waterman Exception “Night & Day” fountain pen (I knew that there is a connection to 100, I just cannot remember what it was that I was thinking!!);
  • a special edition Conway Stewart “Garner 100” model in Patriot Stripe, #12 of 100 (Tommy Garner was one of the co-founders of Conway Stewart);
  • another Waterman Liaison except this one is in woodgrain ebonite (As noted above, the Liaison model was one of two flagships of the Waterman line, at least for a time.  Waterman had a practice of offering two models that represented the peak of the pen-maker’s art at the timee – one classic and one avant-garde. The Liaison was a classic model.);
  • a standard 3-band model (vintage) Conway Stewart 100 (the top of the line 100 was launched c. 1955 and was available only in black);
  • a limited edition Levenger/Conway Stewart pen in green whirl, #009 of 100;
  • a vintage Mabie Todd Swan Self-Filler (S.F.) 100 in woodgrain ebonite; and finally,
  • a vintage Pelikan 100 (the Pelikan model 100 pens were launched c. 1928, featuring a revolutionary piston pump ink filling mechanism and  a transparent section that allowed the user to view the amount of ink remaining in the pen. The Pelikan 100 series of fountain pens are cherished by both Pelikan and vintage pen collectors alike.).

Not a bad list, all things considered.  Now it’s your turn – what obvious and not so obvious pen or pen(s) have we missed or can you outthink us?  Do you have an idea for “100” pens that no one else could possibly think of? 

Thanks for reading!

 
 
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What is Your Perfect Pen and Why?

By LPC member Rafal

From time to time we suggest and pick particular themes for our meetings. Those themes have to only loosely be related to pens, inks and papers. The theme for April 3, 2010 was for each member to bring the pen from his/her collection that they would consider the “perfect” pen (for him or her) right now and explain why they chose that particular pen.

There was a strong suspicion that the idea of a “perfect pen” would mean many different things to many different people but some suggested selection criteria included:

– How the pen fits them?
– How the nib matches their preference for most of their writing
(smoothness level, flow rate, stiffness, and point size/shape)?
– How durable is the construction?

– How it matches their esthetic tastes?
– How easy it is to fill and how it matches their ink capacity requirements?

We thought that this exercise might reveal a few interesting observations including:

– The “perfect” pen for someone might not be their most favourite pen;
– There might be a lot of variety in the pens selected by the group or there may be
some similarities; and

– We might even find that there are some repetitions.

This turned out to be a pretty interesting topic of discussion and here are the pens each member brought (along with the reasons for their choice) and a slide show  of those perfect pens:

Rick: Parker 75 Cisele
– Size / weight just right
– Dry writing wine nib –  just likes Rick likes
– Cartridge capability – great for travel
– Classic design

John: Waterman Edson
– Perfect size
– Broad nib – pretty much the only nib for John
– Very pretty  – navy blue color with gold trim
– Sentimental value – it was a gift from John’s employer for 25 years of service
– Does not have a vacumatic filling mechanism 😉

Mike: Tibaldi Iride
– It’s the pen that David wants more than any other from his collection but can’t have it.

Dan: Sheaffer 300
– Has a nice heft
– Spring loaded clip
– Durable

David: Modern Aurora 88 (large) with a stub nib
– Black with silver trim
– Size / feel
– Piston filler
– Great nib
– Classic, elegant design
– Italian pen

Doug: Delta 20th Anniversary
– Feel in hand
– Barrel shape is smooth and flowing
– Ink flow on the wet side
– Nib is ‘right’ – It’s neither fine or medium or broad, it is just right.
– Colour – Orange Black
– Filling system – Vintage classic (lever)
– Construction – Screw-on cap (when posted to end of barrel). At first he thought it was a hassle and stupid. Now everything lines up. Cap never falls off.
– A larger pen, yet again, body flow and colour… Writing for hours…
– Gold nib, and it has some flex
– Classic design

Marie: Sheaffer 300
– Size
– Nice to write with
– Colour
– Durability

Stan: Waterman 100 Year Pen
– Perfect flexible nib – almost calligraphic.
– Lends itself very well to Stan’s style of writing

Patrick: Parker 51 Slender
– Matches his jacket
– Perfect weight / balance posted and not posted
– Awesomeness,
– Classic
– Hooded nib design
– Nice nib
– Discrete

Ben:Waterman Expert II
– Colour – light blue
– Dependable
– Reliable
– Flows smoothly
– Can be used anytime (always ready to write)

Rafal: Parker 51 Aerometric
– Perfect Size
– Smooth, wet XF nib
– Elegant styling
– Very durable and easy to service

After everyone’s choices were revealed, a few things became apparent:
– Out of 11 pens, Waterman and Parker were picked most often [3 times each (27%)/6 out of the 11 in total (55%)];
– Out of modern pens, Sheaffer 300 was picked twice (67%) and out of vintage
pens Parker 51 was picked twice (67%);
– 4 pens were vintage (36%) and 7 were modern (64%);
– The cartridge/converter filling system was picked most often [5 times (45%)];
– The pens picked were either American or Italian brands;
– Surprisingly, there were no German or Japanese pens picked; and,
– The nib/writing characteristics was used as a criteria by 9 out of
11 participants (82%).

It would be interesting to compare the results of this exercise if these same question was asked a year from now.

We’d love to hear what your perfect pen is and why?  Maybe you think the same as some of our members or maybe something completely different.  Let us know!