Heavy Metal (Pens that is)!

Somewhere in an alternate universe, with the music of Black Sabbath, Iron Maiden and Metallica blasting in the background, the rebels of the London Pen & Motorcycle Club gathered at their Williams on Wonderland HQ to binge on coffee and show off their new ink, like this beauty that Doc showed up with (he’s not a real Doctor, that’s just a name he picked up somewhere):

From Fenix Tattoos in Seattle
From Fenix Tattoos in Seattle

Well, that’s not exactly what happened … we did binge on coffee and heavy metal, pens that is …if a pen sticks to a magnet, it meets the test!! Bring your flighters, filigrees, overlays, signets, silver, gold (more likely gold-filled), aluminum, titanium, gunmetal, shiny or matte and all combinations and permutations thereof. Some like their pens with a patina (you might say potana) and others like them looking brand spanking shiny new. They could be factory or farm fresh – maybe have a few scratches and dents or even some brassing, we won’t hold that against them. And don’t forget your pens that are part-metal, i.e., they might have a metal cap with a resin or other body; however, metal trim-only is not enough metal, sorry.

To wit, a great collection, in a large variety of makes, models and finishes – Sheaffer Targas and a significant number of Parker:

whole bunch more

Anyone for a Parker 75 – just pick your finish:

whack of 75s

Some Parkers, at least one Sheaffer (a Targa, I think) and a Pilot Birdie(?):

table shot

A Waterman 452 1/2V sterling silver filigree (pierced work) overlay and a bottle of Herbin Vert Olive:

small waterman w overlayA true classic, the Parker 75 Cisele:

parker 75

Another Parker 75, a Sheaffer Connoisseur and a Pilot Birdie:

P75 connoisseur and birdie

Quite a mixed bag here from L to R – a Montblanc Meisterstuck Sterling Silver Solitaire Le Grand 146, a Dani Trio Phantas aka the “snake pen”, a Sheaffer Imperial and an older model of the Visconti Travelling Inkwell:

MB146 and snake pen

A close-up of the Dani Trio Phantas (snake pen) …

IMG_1639

… and a close-up of the Sheaffer Imperial Brass engraving:

sheaffer imperial brassA couple of one-piece metal pens, i.e., an integrated nib, a titanium Parker 50 aka the “Falcon” and a Namiki-Pilot M90:
integrated nibs M90 and P50 falcon

Not sure this Stipula/Chatterley Pens Carbon Future Oversized Etruria LE qualifies but it is one sweet writer with that 1.1 mm stub nib!

IMG_1636

Remember these Cross pens – graduation presents, wedding gifts, they were ubiquitous:

cross cross cross

Can you say vermeil?  Rotring 600s, Sheaffer Targas and Imperials and a couple of Parkers:

IMG_1632

The old hidden compartment pen … how did that bottle of ink get in the picture?

hidden compartment pen

What – is this a remnant from the alternate universe, a Waterman Harley-Davidson:

Harley

A number of Parker Flighters with a couple of 75s for good measure:

flighters and 75s

We have some Sheaffers, a Lamy Studio and a blue Kaweco off to the side

bns

The pen in focus is an Aurora 80th Anniversary Limited Edition, a brilliant guilloche pattern cut in sterling silver while the pen slightly out of focus is a Conway Stewart “Drake” LE:aurora guilloche untitled

A side shot (above) and head-on shot (below) of the Aurora 80th anniversary LE, a Conway Stewart “Drake” LE (this is a massive pen, made from a solid rod of sterling silver, guilloche engraved in a classic wave pattern), a Conway Stewart J. Rake Demonstrator (based on their classic Duro design), a Parker 51 Special Edition (from 2002), a Parker 51 Flighter, a Visconti Spider, a Visconti Skeleton, a Waterman Carene Deluxe, a Waterman Exception Night and Day Gold, and of course, a Waterman Edson:

MAW2

What about you?  We always love to hear what you think of these Heavy Metal Pens as well as about your own Heavy Metal pens.  Do you have a particular favourite?  Surely you have at least one?

“100” Pens – November 5 and 12, 2011

We decided to use a different type of theme for November 5 and 12, 2011 – “Pens associated in some way with the number 100”.  Now there are the obvious choices like those pens with “100” in their model name., e.g., a Conway Stewart 100 or a Parker 100.  Having said that, we challenged our club members to think about this one, confident that that they are all a bit smarter (and creative) to come up with a pen or pens with a model number of 100.  For example, they might consider pens that cost $100 or are a 100 years old or are number 100 of xyxyx or number xx of 100? Maybe they have used a pen 100 times or a pen that is now worth $100.  I think you get the gist of what we are thinking. 
  
One perhaps obvious but still interesting idea was a combination of two pens, in this case, a Parker 25 matched with a Parker 75 in similar finishes – stainless steel and black.  Nice thinking!

 

 
Of course, let’s not forget one of the obvious choices, a Parker 100, in cobalt black.  
 

Now in the tray of pens below, there is a veritable potpourri of “100” pens, mostly modern with a few vintage mixed in for good measure!

From left to right, are the following fountain pens:
  • a blue Waterman Charleston (that is based on the Waterman 100 year pen);
  • a Waterman LeMan 100 Opera Series pen  in black acrylic resin over brass and carved with a unique chased bargello stitch pattern;
  • a limited edition Waterman Liaison “Cobra” fountain pen with black chasing that makes it ‘look’ and ‘feel’ like snake skin (the Liaison replaced the Man 100/200 as Waterman’s “top of the line” pen c. 1994);
  • a black & gold Waterman Exception “Night & Day” fountain pen (I knew that there is a connection to 100, I just cannot remember what it was that I was thinking!!);
  • a special edition Conway Stewart “Garner 100” model in Patriot Stripe, #12 of 100 (Tommy Garner was one of the co-founders of Conway Stewart);
  • another Waterman Liaison except this one is in woodgrain ebonite (As noted above, the Liaison model was one of two flagships of the Waterman line, at least for a time.  Waterman had a practice of offering two models that represented the peak of the pen-maker’s art at the timee – one classic and one avant-garde. The Liaison was a classic model.);
  • a standard 3-band model (vintage) Conway Stewart 100 (the top of the line 100 was launched c. 1955 and was available only in black);
  • a limited edition Levenger/Conway Stewart pen in green whirl, #009 of 100;
  • a vintage Mabie Todd Swan Self-Filler (S.F.) 100 in woodgrain ebonite; and finally,
  • a vintage Pelikan 100 (the Pelikan model 100 pens were launched c. 1928, featuring a revolutionary piston pump ink filling mechanism and  a transparent section that allowed the user to view the amount of ink remaining in the pen. The Pelikan 100 series of fountain pens are cherished by both Pelikan and vintage pen collectors alike.).

Not a bad list, all things considered.  Now it’s your turn – what obvious and not so obvious pen or pen(s) have we missed or can you outthink us?  Do you have an idea for “100” pens that no one else could possibly think of? 

Thanks for reading!